Thoroughbred

Thoroughbreds are the racecars of the horse world. They are light horses. Most Thoroughbreds weigh less than 1,500 pounds. This is about the same weight as a small car. The average Thoroughbred is five feet tall from hooves to withers.

Grace says:

The withers is the bump at the base of the horse’s neck where it meets the back.

Thoroughbreds get their power and speed from their strong back legs. As they run their back legs act like springs and push them forward. The front legs pull them along, and their head and long neck keep them steady and fast. Lots of horses run fast, but Thoroughbreds can run fast for longer distances. The fastest thoroughbred speed ever recorded in a race was 43 miles per hour!

Jack says:

Thoroughbreds have a very fast metabolism. This means they have to eat more than other horses their size to stay healthy.

The Thoroughbred breed began in England over 300 years ago. All Thoroughbreds came from stallions that were found in the Middle East. When they ran, people were amazed by their speed and endurance.

Jack says:

The first Thoroughbred horse was brought to America in 1730. He was named Bulle Rock.

All Thoroughbreds love to race, and the most important race in the world is called the Kentucky Derby. There are over 35,000 three-year-old Thoroughbred horses in the world today. Only 20 will be good enough to go to Churchill Downs and race in the Kentucky Derby.

Jack says:

All Thoroughbreds birthdays are recorded as January 1.

When a Thoroughbred is running at top speed, his heart beats ten times faster than when he is standing still. When a man is running his fastest, his heart beat increases only four times faster than normal.

Grace says:

When people call Thoroughbreds “hot” they mean they have tons of energy.